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Wednesday, April 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of The yield of Douglas fir in the Pacific northwest found in the catalog.

The yield of Douglas fir in the Pacific northwest

Richard Edwin McArdle

The yield of Douglas fir in the Pacific northwest

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  • 10 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir -- Northwest, Pacific.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Richard E. McArdle ; with a section on application of yield tables, by Walter H. Meyer.
    SeriesTechnical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 201, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 201.
    ContributionsMeyer, Walter H., United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination64 p., [8] p. of plates :
    Number of Pages64
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23003791M

    Production of merchantable wood in even-aged Douglas-fir stands can be increased substantially by precommercial thinning. Guidelines for, and gains from, precommercial thinning both strongly depend on the size of trees wanted at the first commercial cut; the larger this size, (1) the fewer trees should be left after precommercial thinning, (2) the greater is the maximum age or tree size at. Ralston, Rebecca. & Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.). (). WestPro, a computer program for simulating uneven-aged Douglas-fir stand growth and yield in the Pacific northwest. Portland, OR: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. MLA Citation. Title. A study of decay in douglas fir in the Pacific Northwest / Related Titles. Series: Department bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) ; no. By.


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The yield of Douglas fir in the Pacific northwest by Richard Edwin McArdle Download PDF EPUB FB2

In the Pacific Northwest, Douglas fir is a tall, massive tree with slowly tapering trunk, attaining great size and age. Excepting only the sequoias of California, Douglas fir is the largest tree of the North American forests. Trees 5 or G feet in diameter and feet tall are common in Cited by: THE YIELD OF DOUGLAS FIR IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST By RICHARD E.

MCARDLE, silviculturist, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, with a section on application of yield tables by WALTER H.

MEYER, silviculturist, and supplemental treatment by DONALD BRUCE,' collaborator CONTENTS. The Yield of the Douglas Fir in the Pacific Northwest Bookseller: George Isbell (Connell, WA, U.S.A.) Bookseller Rating: Quantity Available: 1 Book Description: U.S.

Department of Agriculture, Soft Cover. Book Condition: Very Good. Stapled wra [Richard Mcardle] on. Additional Physical Format: Online version: McArdle, Richard E.

(Richard Edwin), Yield of Douglas fir in the Pacific northwest. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Wood Productivity of Pacific Northwest Douglas-Fir: Estimates from Growth-and-Yield Models • David D.

Marshall and Eric C. Turnblom Wih increses n havest of forests ment of forest management Paciic ; ields at age 45 for a well-stocked nat­. The yield of Douglas fir in the Pacific northwest (Technical bulletin) [Richard Edwin McArdle] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.4/5(1).

Douglas-fir is the name of an entire genus of trees that contains six species--two native to North America and four native to eastern Asia. Because of its similarity to other genera, Douglas-fir has given botanists fits.

It has, at various times, been called a pine, a spruce, a hemlock, and a true fir. The Yield of Douglas-fir in the Pacific Northwest.

B had an enormous influence on development of Douglas-fir forestry and was arguably the most influential single research publication ever produced in the Pacific Northwest. We review the evolution of this research and some associated topics, and the role of the major personalities involved.

The yield of Douglas-fir in the Pacific Northwest measured by international 1/4-inch kerf log rule. PNW Old Series Research Notes No. 46, p. ; Posted Date: Janu ; Modified Date: May 6, Author: Philip A.

Briegleb. The Yield of Douglas Fir in the Pacific Northwest TIN No. Revised October Slightly revised May BY RICHARD E. McARDLE, Silviculturist Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station Forest Service WITH A SECTION ON APPLICATION OF YIELD TABLES BY WALTER H.

MEYER, Silviculturist AND A SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT BY. Douglas-fir trees at Silver Falls State Park. (Oregon State Archives Photo) The Douglas-fir was designated as the official state tree by the legislature in Oregon was the eighth state to name a state tree. It is named for David Douglas, a botanist who described the tree on his first trip to the Pacific Northwest in Douglas fir habitat, particularly areas containing the coast Douglas fir variety, is one of the most productive forest types in the world.

Today, Douglas fir is one of the world’s most economically important timber trees due to its quick growth as well as the versatility and usefulness of.

McArdle, Richard E. & Meyer, Walter H. & Bruce, Donald, "The Yield of Douglas Fir in the Pacific Northwest," Technical BulletinsUnited States. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

Site index curves for Douglas-fir in the Pacific Northwest by King, James E.,Weyerhaeuser Forestry Research Center edition, in EnglishPages:   The fire history of Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests is varied and complex because Douglas-fir exists in a variety of forest types over a wide range of environments.

Douglas-fir has been dominant over this region because of disturbance by fire and the species' adaptations to fire. Human-caused fires have been locally important, but lightning appears to be most significant.

(click on each photo to enlarge image) Needles: White on both top and bottom surfaces; about 1" long; shaped like a hockey stick. Massed on the upper surface of the twig. A tiny ridge runs the length of the upper side (compare with groove on noble fir).

Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii, also known as Coast Douglas-fir, Pacific Douglas-fir, Oregon pine, or Douglas spruce, is an evergreen conifer native to western North America from west-central British Columbia, Canada southward to central California, United Oregon and Washington its range is continuous from the Cascades crest west to the Pacific Coast Ranges and Pacific : Pinaceae.

The coast Douglas-fir variety is the dominant tree west of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest, occurring in nearly all forest types, competes well on most parent materials, aspects, and slopes. Adapted to a moist, mild climate, it grows larger and faster than Rocky Mountain : Pinaceae.

Money Trees is an interdisciplinary history of the crucial decades that shaped the modern American conception of the value of the forest. It begins with early 20th century environmental changes in the Douglas Fir forests of the Pacific Northwest, which led to.

And because no other tree is more iconic to the Pacific Northwest (our home) than the Douglas-fir. Among the world’s tallest trees, these stately conifers once blanketed all of Vancouver Island. Often called the skyscrapers of the forest, Douglas-firs are a straight-trunked tree with a spire-like crown, and can grow up to 30 stories high.

This report updates data and comparisons from previous reports (Curtis and othersCurtis ) on a series of precommercial thinning and yield trials in high-elevation true fir-hemlock stands, using data from the 12 replicates for which year data are now available.

The stands were varying mixtures of Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis (Douglas ex Loudon) Douglas ex Forbes), western. Douglas firs yield more high-quality construction lumber than any other tree in the world. Most intriguing of all, perhaps, is that the story of the Douglas fir has gone untold.

Douglas Fir fills this literary gap and presents an engaging profile of the Douglas fir and its relationship to people, commerce, culture, and. To establish Douglas-Fir National Monument comprising federal public lands in the upper North, Middle and South Santiam watersheds in Oregon, to conserve and fully restore a naturally functioning landscape dominated by old-growth forests, as well as to protect the scenic beauty and recreational opportunities for the benefit of this and future generations.

Douglas-fir has been introduced as an ornamental tree in arboreta and parks since From the end of the 19 th century it was planted at a progressive rate in the forests of var - ious European countries, especially after the second world war.

Another type that can bring out memories of the Pacific Northwest is the Douglas fir. Douglas fir has the distinction of not being a “true fir,” and can only be found either on the west coast or eastern Asia.

Douglas fir is also a commonly sought-after building material and is typically not hard to find across the country. Washington's forests have always been a prominent element of its history. Until the past years, tall and dense stands of Douglas fir, hemlock, spruce, and cedar blanketed most of the area from the crest of the Cascade Range to the water's edge.

Ponderosa pines. David Douglas is one of the best-known botanists in Oregon history, primarily because of the tree that bears the common name Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, once Pinus douglasii), the Oregon state humble beginnings and through fortunate circumstance, he became a highly regarded collector of Pacific Northwest plants and animals, which he sent to the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in.

Douglas-fir trees in some foothills around the Willamette Valley are afflicted with Swiss needle cast. The disease produces a pale overall appearance and sparse crown as individual needles turn yellow and drop. “Swiss needle cast disease has been a problem in.

Douglas fir is the type of fir most favored by builders of residential and small commercial buildings, industrial and multi-level structures and bridges. This wood -- native to the Pacific.

Traveling across the state, you soon discover that Oregon is home to a wide range of trees. There are 30 native coniferous species and 37 native species of broadleaf trees. Oregon varies greatly in terms of elevation, temperature, wind, rainfall and soil composition.

Combinations of all these factors help determine the dominant tree species of an area. Initiation of an old-growth Douglas-fir stand in the Pacific Northwest: a reconstruction from tree-ring records Linda E. Winter, Linda B. Brubaker, Jerry F. Franklin, Eric A. Miller, and Donald Q. DeWitt Abstract: We used tree-ring records to reconstruct the stand initiation of an old-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.).

The Yield Of Douglas Fir In The Pacific Northwest. These are the books for those you who looking for to read the The Yield Of Douglas Fir In The Pacific Northwest, try to read or download Pdf/ePub books and some of authors may have disable the live the book if it available for your country and user who already subscribe will have full access all free books from the library source.

My new book, Money Trees: The Douglas Fir and American Forestry,is about management of Douglas fir forests, but also about the ways the challenges of managing the Douglas fir forests of the Pacific Northwest influenced the profession of American forestry. The history of the O&C Lands is one part of this bigger story of forest.

Cause Armillaria ostoyae (may be referred to as A. solidipes in some publications) is the species associated with most conifer mortality in the Pacific Northwest, while A.

mellea is considered rare. This fungus occurs on the roots of many forest tree species. Douglas-fir, grand fir, white fir, and sugar pine can be severely damaged. Western larch and incense cedar are most resistant, while. Douglas-fir is a dimorphic species with two more-or-less distinct forms.

One of these is restricted to the forests of the Pacific slope and the other to those of the Rocky Mountain region. Douglas-fir comprises about 50 percent of the standing timber in the western forests. It produces more timber than any other American species.

Perhaps the most notable recent example would be the northern spotted owl, whose listing resulted in a great reduction of logging in the old-growth Douglas fir forests of. But they are tall, beautiful conifers native to the Pacific Northwest. For information about growing Douglas firs and tips on Douglas fir tree care, read on.

Douglas Fir Information. Douglas fir information mentions two species of Douglas fir, the coastal variety and the Rocky Mountain variety. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), perhaps the most common tree in Oregon, is the most important conifer in the state because of its ecological and economic Oregon legislature recognized this when it designated Douglas-fir the official state tree in Eight of ten conifers west of the Cascades are Douglas-firs.

ABOUT 06 | PACIFIC NORTHWEST. The sixth and final art print in the Quilted American Landscapes collection highlights the northwestern-most corner of the contiguous United States: the Olympic Peninsula and Puget Sound region of Washington State.

It is here that the dense, mountainous forests of Sitka Spruce, Western Hemlock and Coastal Douglas-fir yield to an unrelenting and unpredictable sea. Early explorers to the Pacific Northwest expected to encounter a land of dense forests.

Instead, their writings reveal that they were often surprised to discover spacious meadows, prairies, & open spaces. Far from a pristine wilderness, much of the Northwest landscape was actively managed & shaped by the hands of its Native American inhabitants.4/5(1). Title. Lumber yield and log values of Shasta red fir / Related Titles.

Related/Analytical: Shasta red fir. Series: U.S. Forest Service research paper PNW, 2 By. Grantham, John Bernard. Hunt, Douglas L. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.) Type. A combination of superior wood quality and high productivity has made Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) one of the premier timber trees in the world.

As such, it is grown as a plantation species in several countries in Europe, South America, New Zealand, and Australia, as well as throughout its extensive natural range in western North by: The Forest Service plan does not make adequate provision for saving such a stand.

It proposes to set aside somewhat less than 6 billion feet of timber, mostly in the higher mountain sections, very little of which is representative of the spruce, cedar, hemlock, and .